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Thursday, June 2, 2011

I Need Help with Gorham Marks

I've stated in several posts that Gorham changed its marking method for flatware in 1950 from the classic "lion/anchor/G Sterling" marks to simply "Gorham Sterling". Lately, I've been wondering if this is entirely accurate. For example, I have not been able to find old marks on patterns like King Edward and Fairfax. Both these patterns existed a few years before 1950.

Can anyone out there shed some light on this? Post a comment if you can.

Thanks.

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6 comments:

Sharon said...

The only thing I have that has "Gorham Sterling Pat." rather than the lion, anchor and G. It's a sugar spoon in the 1938 Nocturne pattern. My Fairfax bears the Durgin mark and my King Edward is Whiting. Perhaps Gorham bought them both out and then started with the new mark?

Anonymous said...

I have a set that reads " Gorham Sterling Pat. I'm trying to find out the value of the set I have. Who should I go to in order to get a price. I'm wanting to sell. I have over 30 pieces.
Tnspitfire00@aol.com Please reply if anyone reading this can help. Thank you.

Tamra said...

I need help finding information on J.A. Henckels Solingen flatware - knives have turquoise inlay on decorative sterling handles and the blade appears to be brass, and forks are sterling.

Silver Jim said...

I believe this is from a German company. I don't have any other information about this set.

Maybe some other reader will.

Anonymous said...

I have a Gorham Sterling King Edward set and I see a marking that may be initials or something looks like "LHP."
Any info will help.

Silver Jim said...

"LHP" does not sound like any standard Gorham mark of which I'm aware. Perhaps these are the initials of the first owner. Or perhaps they represent the original retailer. I vote for the first owner's initials.